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My main research interests lie in women in antiquity, gender studies, Greek and Latin poetry, and classical reception, with a focus on the intersection between gender and poetics in the ancient world and its contemporary reception. 

 

My Ph.D. dissertation, Since Sappho: Women in Classical Literature and Contemporary Women's Writing, explored four women of the ancient world (Helen of Troy, Penelope, Sappho and Lavinia) in conjunction with their reception in female-authored works of modern fiction, including Margaret Atwood's The Penelopiad and Ursula Le Guin's Lavinia. Its main aim is to argue for a reconsideration of the currency of women in classical literature, and to shed new light on our understanding of the connection between women and verse literature in Greek and Roman antiquity and women's writing in the twenty-first century.

My current research, stemming from my work on female authors in my dissertation, focuses on the semantics of authorship terminology, particularly as it relates to gender. I'm fascinated by the question of what female authors like Sappho would have called themselves within the constraints of a gendered language. Two articles based on this research have been published in Ramus and Eugesta, and form the basis for my current book on authorship terminology and gender in the classical world.

I have taught at Yale University and Harvard University, and am passionate about bringing the classical world alive to my students, whether I'm teaching beginning Latin, intermediate Greek or an upper-level undergraduate seminar on the classical tradition. Further details about my research and teaching are available in the CV below.

 
 

Publications


BOOKS


Bär, Silvio and Emily Hauser (eds.) Reading Poetry, Writing Genre: English Poetry and Literary Criticism in Dialogue with Classical Scholarship. Forthcoming with Bloomsbury’s Studies in Classical Reception series, December 2018.


BOOKS (FICTION)


For the Most Beautiful. London: Transworld (Penguin Random House), pp. 320, 2016.

For the Winner. London: Transworld (Penguin Random House), pp. 368, 2017.

For the Immortal. London: Transworld (Penguin Random House), pp. 352, 2018.


ARTICLES


“ ‘There is another story’: Writing after the Odyssey in Margaret Atwood’s The Penelopiad.” Classical Receptions Journal (2018) 10 (2): 109–26.

“In Her Own Words: The Semantics of Female Authorship in Ancient Greece, from Sappho to Nossis.” Ramus (2016) 45 (2): 133–64.

Optima tu proprii nominis auctor: The Semantics of Female Authorship in Ancient Rome, from Sulpicia to Proba.” Eugesta (2016) 6: 151–86.


CHAPTERS


“Introduction.” For Reading Poetry, Writing Genre: English Poetry and Literary Criticism in Dialogue with Classical Scholarship, edited by Silvio Bär and Emily Hauser.

“‘Homer Undone’: Homeric Scholarship and the Invention of Female Epic.” For Reading Poetry, Writing Genre: English Poetry and Literary Criticism in Dialogue with Classical Scholarship, edited by Silvio Bär and Emily Hauser.


REVIEWS AND TRANSLATIONS


Review of Dickison S. and J. Hallett, eds. (2015) A Roman Women Reader: Selections from the Second Century BCE through the Second Century CE. Mundelein IL: Bolchazy-Carducci. With Victoria Leonard. In Cloelia n.s. 5 (October 2015): available online.

Review of Karanika A. (2014) Voices at Work: Women, Performance and Labor in Ancient Greece. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. In Cloelia n.s. 4 (October 2014): available online.

Review of Graziosi B. and J. Haubold (2010) Homer: Iliad, Book VI. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. In The Classical Review 63.1 (April 2013): 5-6.

Translation of Rousseau P. (2001) “L’Intrigue de Zeus,” in Europa 79: 120-158. Published as “The Plot of Zeus” on The Center for Hellenic Studies website, Harvard University (2011): available online.